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NASA GES DISC provides access to data from Aura instruments

Aura Science Team meeting convenes October 1-3

NASA GES DISC provides access to data from Aura instruments

The Aura satellite was launched on July 15, 2004. Aura instruments provide data on the concentration of many different chemical species in Earth’s atmosphere, from the troposphere to the stratosphere.

NASA GES DISC provides access to data from Aura instruments

 

The Science Team for the NASA Earth Observing System Aura mission, now in its 8th year of atmospheric chemistry data collection, is convening October 1-3, 2012 in Pasadena, California. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has a strong connection to the Aura mission, as it provides data from all four of the instruments on the Aura satellite. Data from the Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) can be ordered from the Mirador data search and access system, as well as visualized with the Giovanni data analysis system. Data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), though not archived at the GES DISC, are available via Giovanni. The archive site for TES data is the Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC).
 
 
Data from the Aura instruments provide crucial information about the state of the changeable chemistry of many trace chemical constituents of Earth’s atmosphere.  Long-term observations of stratospheric and total ozone made by the Aura sensors have played an important role in tracking the state of the Antarctic “ozone hole” and its slow recovery. OMI provides information not only on ozone, but also on the levels of harmful UV-B radiation reaching the surface. In addition, OMI also provides data on key air quality pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and aerosols produced in biomass and fossil fuel burning. OMI also tracks sulfur dioxide and aerosol particles from volcanic activities.
 
MLS provides vertical cross-sections of the concentration of many different chemical species in the atmosphere. HIRDLS provides data for many of these same constituents, with increased accuracy in the upper atmosphere. TES observes Earth’s lower atmospheric layers and gives researchers important information about pollutants such as ozone and carbon monoxide, and also about water vapor, methane, and atmospheric temperature.
 
James Johnson of the NASA GES DISC is attending the Aura Science Team meeting this week. He will be giving a presentation entitled “GES DISC Status and Data Preservation Activities” to the Data Systems Working Group.
 
The OMI Science Team meeting will also take place in Pasadena October 4-6, after the Aura Science Team meeting.

 

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Last updated: Oct 02, 2012 02:36 PM ET