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2008 Fall AGU Meeting: Atmospheric aerosols presentations

Atmospheric aerosols (such as dust, soot, smoke, and sulfate) affect the Earth and remote sensing observations of the Earth, which is why the GES DISC has four posters concerning atmospheric aerosol data at the 2008 Fall AGU Meeting in San Francisco.

The expertise of the GES DISC in the important geoscience topic of atmospheric aerosols, and other atmospheric data products, is on display in four different presentations at the 2008 Fall AGU Meeting in San Francisco.

(Note:   summaries of presentations with GES DISC staff as either first authors or co-authors are included in this news article.)

"Analysis of Interannual Variability of MODIS Terra and Aqua Aerosols and Clouds" presents a cross-section of methods to examine the interannual variability of the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data product from MODIS.    Various factors which influence the data product are investigated.   Authors:   Greg Leptoukh, Viktor Zubko, and Arun Gopalan.

This is an oral presentation scheduled for Tuesday, December 16, in Moscone Center Room 2009, session A22A-06, at 1145.

Link to session abstracts

"Reusing Information Management Services for Recommended Decadal Study Missions That Facilitate Aerosol and Cloud Studies" discusses the heritage of the GES DISC earth science data systems, and how this heritage can support potential new decadal study missions.   The GES DISC provides comprehensive information services capabilities with 14 years of experience working with instrument teams and the scientific community.  GES DISC in-house experience with the archive and distribution systems include S4PA, S4PM, Mirador, Giovanni, and data mining.    The GES DISC  therefore possesses ideal reuse capabilities for future mission data support.    Authors:  Gary Alcott, Chris Lynnes, Greg Leptoukh, Steve Berrick, and Bruce Vollmer.

This presentation is a poster scheduled for Monday, December 15, at 0800, in Moscone Center Hall D, session A11D, poster 0146.

Link to session abstracts

 

"Equatorial Superrotation on Earth Induced by Optically Thick Dust Clouds"  involves an unusual response of the Earth's atmosphere to "exceptional" aerosol events, in this case the eruption of the supervolcano Mount Toba approximately 71,000 years ago.   Superrotation is an atmospheric phenomenon observed on Venus and the Saturnian moon Titan.    The climate effects of the induced superrotation on winds in the upper troposphere are highlighted.  Authors:  Xun Zhu, Luke Oman, Darryn Waugh, and Steve Lloyd.

This presentation is a poster scheduled for Monday, December 15, at 0800, in Moscone Center Hall D, session A11E, poster 0188.

Link to session abstracts

" Mineral dust characterization over the North Atlantic/ Saharan desert regions from combined satellite aerosol retrievals and AERONET observations for transport model applications"  demonstrates the use of MISR and MODIS aerosol data products to examine various processes affecting atmospheric aerosols, including:  desert dust plume transport over water, evolution of aerosol optical thickness, and changes in particle size and shape distributions.    The results are applicable to climate, forecast, and transport models.   The study utilizes comparisons of MISR and MODIS data to GOCART and NAAPS predictions for specific events.    The study also analyzes aerosol properties and trends over the period 2004 to 2008.   Authors:   Olga Kalashnikova,  Ralph Kahn, Mian Chin, Jianglong Zhong, and Greg Leptoukh.

This is an oral presentation scheduled for Tuesday, December 16, in Moscone Center Room 2009, at 0945.

Link to session abstracts

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Last updated: Nov 19, 2009 01:10 PM ET
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