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warn_icon.gif IMPORTANT MESSAGE Jul 25, 2014    Nearing the end of the TRMM Era   

From PPS: Since December 1997, TRMM and the instruments it carries have provided valuable information to researchers, the applications community, and the public.  On July 8, 2014, pressure readings from the fuel tank indicated that TRMM is at the end of its fuel.  As a result, NASA has ceased station keeping maneuvers and TRMM has begun its drift downward from its operating altitude of 402 km.

 A small amount of fuel has been retained to conduct debris avoidance maneuvers to ensure the satellite remains safe during the drift down.

 TRMM observations will continue as the spacecraft descends to 335 km, at which time it will be shutdown prior to re-entry.

This date is nominally estimated to be February 2016, but may change depending on solar activity.  While TMI and LIS will continue operating during the entire drift down period, the TMI data will be affected. TMI incidence angle will be changing as will the field of view. Users should adjust their use of TMI data to reflect these changing values. However, we expect useful data to continue especially for non-climate research.

 JAXA has indicated that they may soon stop distribution of the radar data since useful science data is only possible within narrow altitude ranges near 400 and 350 km. When TRMM reaches 350 km (its original altitude), radar data may resume for a short period.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall.

Instruments onboard the TRMM satellite

Basic Information

Launch Date
November 27, 1997
Orbit
Circular, non-sun-synchronous, with an inclination of 35 degrees to the Equator.
Orbit Altitude

350 km (1997/11/27 - 2001/08/08)

403 km (2001/08/24 - present)

Altitude Change
During the period of 2001/8/7 to 2001/8/14, the average operating altitude changed from 350 km to 403 km (referred to also as TRMM Boost).


Instruments

Below are overview descriptions of the instruments on the TRMM satellite:

Visible Infrared Radiometer (VIRS)
The VIRS (of NOAA AVHRR heritage) is a five-channel, cross-track scanning radiometer operating at 0.63, 1.6, 3.75, 10.8, and 12 um, which provides high resolution observations on cloud coverage, cloud type, and cloud top temperatures.
TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI)
The TMI (of DMSP SSM/I heritage) is a multichannel passive microwave radiometer operating at five frequencies: 10.65, 19.35, 37.0, and 85.5 GHz at dual polarization and 22.235 GHz at single polarization. The TMI provides information on the integrated column precipitation content, cloud liquid water, cloud ice, rain intensity, and rainfall types (e.g., stratiform or convective).
Precipitation Radar (PR)
The PR, the first of its kind in space, is an electronically scanning radar, operating at 13.8 GHz that measures the 3-D rainfall distribution over both land and ocean, and define the layer depth of the precipitation.

Further information on these instruments may be found on the TRMM Instruments Web page.


Latest News

Image of the GPM satellite, showing the locations of the Microwave Imager and the Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar.
Jul 29, 2014 - Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and Partner Radiometer Data released through NASA GES DISC

Common inter-calibrated microwave brightness temperature (Tc) products to ensure consistency among global precipitation retrieval & climate studies

+ Read More…
MODIS-Terra images of seasonal flooding in Malawi. Left: 12/26/2006. Right: 1/11/2007. The Shire River, subject of a 2014 paper that used Giovanni, flows from Lake Malawi into the Zambezi River through wetlands, including the “Elephant Marsh".
Jul 28, 2014 - Giovanni publications for the first half of 2014

103 publications tallied in peer-reviewed journals or scientific books

+ Read More…
Precipitation time series for the Bosnia-Herzegovina flood event in mid-May 2014.
Jun 27, 2014 - The June 2014 issue of The Giovanni News is online

Articles on Giovanni 4.8 release, Bosnia-Herzegovina floods, Czech Republic vegetation

+ Read More…
On average, the western Florida Panhandle receives about 100 mm of rain in April.
Jun 13, 2014 - Record-shattering rain inundates Pensacola, Florida in late April 2014

In two days, the area received 5-6 times the normal monthly rainfall for April

+ Read More…
This Giovanni image shows particulate inorganic carbon concentrations during the Lake Ontario whiting event in August 2013.
Jun 05, 2014 - Article in Earthzine highlights use of Giovanni for public health research

Data are used for research on infectious disease, air quality, and water quality

+ Read More…

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Last updated: May 27, 2010 04:35 PM ET